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Black Republicans: Who is Mia Love?

Ebony Turner, Opinion Editor

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Ludmya “Mia” Bourdeau Love, born and raised in Brooklyn, New York of Haitian descent is Mormon and Republican. In my short life, the one thing I have noticed about Republicans in this recent day and age is that being a Republican and Black is not easy. You are constantly bombarded with criticisms that this party is “not for you,” and people affiliated to the Republican Party are far too conservative to care about the plight of Blacks. I felt the same sentiment as well toward Black Republicans, especially in lieu of our Black Democratic President. I never understood how any Black person could truly be affiliated with this party that harbors a tremendous amount of bigoted and ignorant politicians who are more concerned with maintaining their low taxes than helping our government in improving this country – that was until I researched Mia Love.

Love is the first Black female mayor of any city in Utah, and didn’t become a Mormon until after she graduated from University of Hartford. While I don’t necessarily agree with her stance as pro-life or even her suggestions to get rid of funding for special education, I do agree with how she feels about making the GOP less conservative. The conservativeness of the party is what makes it so unattractive for the youth of today. The GOP is not relatable for a lot of young people because as generations move into adulthood, the liberal way we were raised becomes that much more evident during adulthood. The GOP simply does not fit in with the kind of progression our nation is seeing and the ideals that are becoming universal.

She feels passionately about making the GOP more attractive to the public, which is a valuable quality in any contender for congress in this day and age. Despite losing the congressional race to Democrat Jim Matheson, Love becoming the first Black congresswomen to represent the Republican Party ever would have been the greatest makeover the GOP has ever seen. The values they place over the issues and platforms that represent their party are not so much outdated as they are exclusive. It feels similar to an exclusive society more than a party, and the pundits that speak on behalf of the party – Ann Coulter and Donald Trump to name a few – don’t make it an easy sell for people who are of color and feel that aligning themselves to the party means turning a blind eye to the obvious racism within it.

Mia Love running for Congress again this year means a woman who is able to represent two of the largest minorities in our country is also able to make decisions for a party that is in desperate need of a makeover. Heavy is the head that wears the crown, and while changing the face of the Republican Party may seem like quite the responsibility, being a name to watch in politics is a great way to start.

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