STDs/STIs On College Campuses: What You Need To Know

STDs%2FSTIs+are+more+present+on+college+campuses+now+more+than+ever.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

STDs/STIs On College Campuses: What You Need To Know

STDs/STIs are more present on college campuses now more than ever.

STDs/STIs are more present on college campuses now more than ever.

Pixabay

STDs/STIs are more present on college campuses now more than ever.

Pixabay

Pixabay

STDs/STIs are more present on college campuses now more than ever.

Jenna Febbo, Health and Beauty Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are present on college campuses now more than ever. The reasons for that have not changed; Unprotected vaginal, anal and oral sex and a lack of sexual education are still to blame. 1 in 4 college students have an STD, according to Stanford University. Does that statistic scare you? Well, it should. Here’s what you need to know.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states people ages 15-24 make up 25% of the sexually active population. This 25% also makes up more than half of STD diagnoses each year. While this is a scary thought, an even scarier thought to consider is that if you are sexually active and have unprotected vaginal and/or oral sex, you may come in contact with an STD and not even know it. The Medical Institute for Sexual Health found that 80% of people who have STDs/STIs don’t have recognizable symptoms.

The most common STD on college campuses, which affects both men and women, is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV), according to the CDC. HPV can sometimes be symptomless and go away on its own, which makes it more likely to be transmitted, but other times, it can be very dangerous. The most common symptom of HPV is genital warts and it is spread through (sexual) skin to skin contact. It is an incurable disease but it can be treated. If left untreated, it can lead to cervical cancer.

The second most common STD on college campuses is Chlamydia. It can affect both men and women and is spread through vaginal, anal, or oral sex. If it goes untreated, Chlamydia can cause severe and permanent damage to both men and women’s reproductive organs. For women, it can be very damaging to their ability to get pregnant. If detected right away, Chlamydia can be treated with antibiotics. If you have unprotected sexual relations with someone with Chlamydia, you can contract it again.

Genital herpes is the third most common STD on college campuses. According to the CDC, genital herpes infects 1 in 5 college students and is spread through vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Although it is a treatable disease, it cannot be completely cured.

The easiest way to protect yourself from STDs/STIs is to use protection, even while having oral sex. The National College Health Assessment Survey found that only 54% of college students use condoms during vaginal intercourse, 29% use condoms during anal sex, and only 4% during oral sex.  If you are sexually active, even in a monogamous a relationship, it is important for you, and your partner, to get tested regularly. Being as educated as possible on STDs/STIs also wouldn’t hurt.

An employee at Pace University’s Health Care Center told The Pace Chronicle that the university does not compile statistics of STDs/STIs on campus.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email