Pace Launches New Brand and Advertising Campaign

Adiba Sikder, Editor-in-Chief

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Pace released THIS IS PACE—a new advertising campaign, website, and brand—in order to raise enrollment rates for future semesters on Mon., Jan. 30.

There will be a five-month period of advertising in the spring and the fall, respectively, according to the email sent by President Stephen Friedman.

Advertisements will be dispersed in newspapers, social media, and public transportation services including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Facebook, the Long Island Railroad (LIRR), and Metro-North station.

Past and current students’ success stories will be featured who will then proceed to refer to a member of Pace who impacted their college experience. Viewers will be led to a website with information on Pace’s motto, Opportunitas, and on the various programs that offered.

After the release of Opportunitas, Pace’s strategic plan, created in 2014, to combine liberal arts, knowledge, and real-life experience in order to get students to achieve their full potential.

Pace was labeled as one of the most underrated colleges in America by Business Insider due to a lot of opportunities students receive for real-life experience and the programs offered to students.

Pace was labeled underrated due to the low enrollment rate, however.

Although Pace hasn’t been receiving as many applicants per year, the acceptance rate for undergraduate students has not gone up in order to increase the numbers. The acceptance rate has gone down about 30 percent in the last ten years.

“Our acceptance rate is currently at 65 percent. A lower acceptance rate can sometimes mean less applicants,” Admissions Counselor Megan Mummy said.

About 2,500 undergraduate students were enrolled out of the 15,000 applications Pace University accepted for the year 2015. The numbers are lower than average due to the stricter requirements in order to attend Pace according to Student Assistant for Admission Kenneth Szeto.

“On the old scale, a high school senior would need a 1090/2400 on the SAT’s. Now one would need an 1130/1600 on the new scale,” Szeto said.

Although having stricter requirements makes it harder for Pace to increase enrollment numbers, the Pace advertisement campaign hopes to reach more people through the advertisements while maintaining the community that they currently have.

Many freshmen claimed that Pace was not their first choice because it was not as well-known as the other schools that they would have preferred to attend.

“I didn’t really know anything about Pace. I only applied because I knew that it had a film program. If I knew more about it, it probably would have been my first choice,” freshman and film major Sydney Krantz said.

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