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Students Gather at ABC to Watch Trump Victory

Thousands+of+people+gather+at+ABC+News+Headquarters+in+Times+Square+to+watch+the+election+results.+%28Photo+by+Joseph+Tucci%29
Thousands of people gather at ABC News Headquarters in Times Square to watch the election results. (Photo by Joseph Tucci)

Thousands of people gather at ABC News Headquarters in Times Square to watch the election results. (Photo by Joseph Tucci)

Thousands of people gather at ABC News Headquarters in Times Square to watch the election results. (Photo by Joseph Tucci)

Joseph Tucci, Managing Editor

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Pace students were among the crowd of thousands of people who gathered at ABC News Headquarters in Times Square to watch the election results and ultimately see Donald Trump win the presidency of the United States of America (USA) on Nov. 8-9.

Trump won with 290 electoral votes over Hillary Clinton’s 228, according to Associated Press as of Nov. 11. Republicans also gained control of the House of Representatives and Senate.

This win came as a surprise to some students.

“I was shocked; I couldn’t believe it. I am happy that I don’t have to deal with the Clintons anymore,” senior David Paulstich said.

First-generation immigrant and New York City (NYC) tourist Ajla Shuapipi said that she fears for her future under the Trump presidency.

“I’m a little scared. [My sister and I] are first-generation immigrants, so it’s kind of hard to imagine that our future president will be someone who’s incredibly racist, xenophobic, sexist, and just terrible all around in my opinion,” Shuapipi said.

Freshman Kat Brous said that she didn’t support Trump because of his actions towards women.

“I agreed with a lot of [Clinton’s] views, and I can’t justify voting for Trump as a woman. I don’t agree with the things that he says and I don’t think he’s a good role model,” Brous said.

Despite the feelings of racism and sexism, a record number of minority women gained a seat in the Senate. Kamala Harris became the first biracial woman in the Senate, being of African American and South Asian descent, after winning in California. Tammy Duckworth, who was born in Thailand, won in Illinois. Finally, Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto became the first Latina elected after winning in Nevada.

“I believe our diversity is our strength. As the first Latina Senator, I will use my seat at the table to fight for diversity. To Nevada and the country: la lucha sigue,” Masto said in a Facebook post.

NYC tourist Rafael Vela said he voted for Trump, despite having disagreements with him, because of Clinton’s alleged corruption.

“[I was against Trump] because of his character flaws, and his wishy-washyness in the past, I don’t know if I can trust his conversion to more conservative views,” Vela said. “But I have a strong distain for Clinton because of my sense of anti-establishment and how she has been part of the establishment for decades, her ties with big money, corporations, and the hiding and lying.”

NYC tourist David Miranda said this election had the worst candidates in the history of the USA, and that they poorly reflected society.

“The candidates represent the people, and we were the ones who put them there,” Miranda said.

The results have led to over 50 protests to break out across the USA against Trump, with some being peaceful, but also some with participants burning the American Flag, shouting that Trump is “not my president,” setting things on fire and vandalizing property according to USA Today. Trump encouraged the peaceful protests.

“Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have passion for our great country. We will all come together and be proud!,” Trump said in a Tweet.

During the event Pace students were interviewed by ABC on how they felt about the election. Attendees were also given special access to an area where they could sit in a small version of the Oval Office, and have a caricature of themselves drawn by artist Cathy Nolan.

Students felt that Pace didn’t have any influence over which candidate they supported. Pace President Stephen Friedman released a statement on Nov. 10 encouraging the Pace Community to come together, and create Opportunitas for every student.

“I don’t think Pace is too political when you see signs it’s not like vote for [Trump or Clinton.] They have election activities but they’re not biased towards one side,” Brous said.

Pace students at ABC. (Photo by Joseph Tucci.)

Pace students at ABC. (Photo by Joseph Tucci.)

A caricature drawn by artist Cathy Nolan. (Photo by Joseph Tucci)

A caricature drawn by artist Cathy Nolan. (Photo by Joseph Tucci)

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